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5 Reasons to Buy This Lenten Journal

Last year, we put together a comprehensive list of Lenten resources in our Handy Dandy List to Lenten Sacrifices. As Lent approached this year, I decided to update it with a few extra links since new resources have popped up. I saw the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist had put together a Lenten Journal, so I added the link. Shortly after Lent started, I received a copy of the journal. Friends, I love what this journal has to offer!

5 Reasons to Buy This Lenten Journal

photo pulled from @CatholicSistas on Instagram

  • It has a comprehensive preparation section so that you can adequately prepare for Lent. You have 10 pages that cover the three forms of penance, as well as questions for self-reflection for each virtue, ways to cultivate that virtue and opposing traits. You have an opportunity to jot down a prayer for perseverance as you head into Lent, asking God for an increase in fortitude and grace.
  • You get to sift through a thorough Disciple of Christ Virtues chart. I couldn’t stop looking over this page. It is filled top to bottom with a myriad of virtues, broken down into their meaning, opposing trait and ways to cultivate that virtue. SCORE! If I want to improve the virtue of…oh, let’s say moderation, for example, I would read its meaning as attention to balance in one’s life with the opposing trait being giving in to being excessive in one or more areas of one’s life and finish with Ways to Cultivate as set limits for oneself; create a balance in one’s life by limiting the use of media, consumption of additional food and drink, etc. 
  • Lectio Divina. The journal takes a Lectio Divina approach to the daily readings. Each day of the journal contains the Gospel readings, followed by a series of questions for reflection. There are beautiful illustrations laced throughout the journal that enhance the readings and reflections. Some questions are derived from the illustrations.
  • Gratitude Log. There is a section at the back in which you can simply write about any situation through the day in which you gave thanks to God or that made you happy. This is such an important part of the Lenten exercise, because we know that God is good, all the time, and giving Him thanks for all He does helps strike balance between the somber nature of Lent and our gratitude.
  • Stations of the Cross. At the back of the journal, there is a section for you to write reflections of the Stations of the Cross complete with pictures of each station as well as Scripture for you to reflect upon.

There are more fun nuggets laced throughout the journal, but I will let you discover those when you buy it. Did I mention it is only SEVEN DOLLARS? The journal is only seven dollars! Even though Lent is already underway, there is so much that can be extracted from this year round, such as application of Lectio Divina, a daily gratitude log and cultivating virtues.

So, I invite you to go ahead and purchase this journal and finish your Lenten disciplines like a marathon runner pushes those last few miles. Go ahead and order it. You will not be disappointed!

 

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About Martina Kreitzer

Martina is a cradle Catholic, wife to Neil, and mother to seven kiddos here {and three in heaven}– 4/96-1/17. She decided to homeschool the kiddos in 2010 after many years in public schools and is currently transitioning out of homeschooling. She is the creator of Catholic Sistas which focuses on a feminine perspective of the Catholic Faith. The website was the result of an existing camaraderie by the contributors in a Catholic women’s group she created. She is also a Seal of Approval evaluator for the Catholic Writers Guild. Lest you think she spends all her time online, Martina has enjoyed getting out into the community by serving on the Pastoral Council from 2010-2013. She is constantly on the lookout to make her parish as welcoming as the small town she grew up in East Texas. This task is not easy given that St. William is the largest parish in the Austin diocese, serving well over twenty thousand parishioners. She loves Jesus, coffee, bacon, chocolate, photography, more bacon, evangelizing, and the company of those unafraid to use their sense of humor.

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